Posts Tagged ‘release’

Hi Folks,

today the Exchange Dev Team launched the new Exchange 2016 RTM:

Exchange Server 2016: Forged in the cloud. Now available on-premises.

Exchange Server 2016 is here and available to download starting today! We’ve spent nearly three years iterating, polishing and refining Exchange since the release of Exchange 2013, and we are excited to put a shiny, new version of Exchange into your hands today. What sets this version of Exchange apart from the past, is that it was forged in the cloud. This release brings the Exchange bits that already power millions of Office 365 mailboxes to your on-premises environment.

Here is a quick video look at some of our favorite features.

Email remains the backbone of business communication and the one that workers consider the most essential tool for getting things done. Because of this, it’s vital to have a modern messaging infrastructure that meets today’s business expectations. With the volume of email and other communications continuing to grow, people need tools that help them focus on what’s most important in their inboxes, schedules and interactions with others at work. And as the quantity of email data grows, so do the demands on IT to manage, preserve and protect it.

To help you meet these challenges, we’ve deepened the integration between Exchange and other Office products, so your organization can be more productive and collaborate more effectively. We’ve made it easier to manage your email with new ways to focus on what’s important, work more efficiently, and accomplish more with your devices. We’ve simplified the Exchange architecture and introduced additional recovery features. We’ve also enhanced our built-in compliance tools for protecting and preserving data.

Exchange 2016 builds on and improves features introduced in Exchange 2013, including Data Loss Prevention, Managed Availability, automatic recovery from storage failures, and the web-based Exchange admin center. Here are a few of our favorite new capabilities:

  • Better collaboration: Exchange 2016 includes a new approach to attachments that simplifies document sharing and eliminates version control headaches. In Outlook 2016 or Outlook on the web, you can now attach a document as a link to SharePoint 2016 (currently in preview) or OneDrive for Business instead of a traditional attachment, providing the benefits of coauthoring and version control.

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  • Improved Outlook web experience: Continuing our effort to provide you with a first class web experience across devices, we’ve made significant updates to Outlook on the web. New features include: Sweep, Pin, Undo, inline reply, a new single-line inbox view, improved HTML rendering, new themes, emojis, and more.

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  • Search: A lightning-fast search architecture delivers more accurate and complete results. Outlook 2016 is optimized to use the power of the Exchange 2016 back end to help you find things faster, across old mail and new. Search also gets more intelligent with Search suggestions, People suggestions, search refiners, and the ability to search for events in your Calendar.

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  • Greater extensibility:  An expanded Add-In model for Outlook desktop and Outlook on the web allows developers to build features right into the Outlook experience. Add-ins can now integrate with UI components in new ways: as highlighted text in the body of a message or meeting, in the right-hand task pane when composing or reading a message or meeting, and as a button or a dropdown option in the Outlook ribbon.

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  • eDiscovery: Exchange 2016 has a revamped eDiscovery pipeline that is significantly faster and more scalable. Reliability is improved due to a new search architecture that is asynchronous and distributes the work across multiple servers with better fault tolerance. You also have the ability to search, hold and export content from public folders.
  • Simplified architecture: Exchange 2016’s architecture reflects the way we deploy Exchange in Office 365 and is an evolution and refinement of Exchange 2013. A combined mailbox and client access server role makes it easier to plan and scale your on-premises and hybrid deployments. Coexistence with Exchange 2013 is simplified, and namespace planning is easier.
  • High availability: Automated repair improvements such as database divergence detection make Exchange easier than ever to run in a highly available way. Stability and performance enhancements from Office 365, many of which were so useful that we shipped them in Exchange 2013 Cumulative Updates, are also baked into the product.

That’s just quick list of highlights; we encourage you to get a full view of what’s new by reviewing the Exchange 2016 documentation on TechNet, and the Product Guide.  Or, if you are in the mood for something more bite-sized, check out these short demo videos in which a few members of the Exchange team show off their favorite features:

Exchange 2016 will follow the same servicing rhythm as Exchange 2013, with Cumulative Updates (CUs) released approximately every three months that contain bug fixes, product refinements, and selected new investments from Office 365. The CUs will include features such as search indexing from passive that we decided needed additional refinement or validation before arriving on-premises. The first CU will arrive in the first quarter of 2016.

For those of you eager to get hands on with Exchange 2016, you can start right away by getting the bits from the Microsoft download center to evaluate the fully-functional product for 180 days. We know that you’re hungry for more in-depth info, so we’ll be publishing a series of deep dive blogs on Exchange 2016 here on the EHLO blog in the weeks ahead.

A big thanks to all those who participated in our Technology Adoption Program, downloaded the public Preview, and contributed feedback to help shape this release. One such participant was King Saud University; read about their experience with Exchange Server 2016.

Enjoy Exchange Server 2016!

(Source: Exchange Team Blog)

Hey Folks,

yesterday, the Exchange Team announced that  SP1 for EXCHANGE 2013 was released:

Exchange Server 2013 Service Pack 1 (SP1) is now available for download! Please make sure to read the release notesbefore installing SP1. The final build number for Exchange Server 2013 SP1 is 15.00.0847.032.

SP1 has already been deployed to thousands of production mailboxes in customer environments via the Exchange Server Technology Adoption Program (TAP). In addition to including fixes, SP1 provides enhancements to improve the Exchange 2013 experience. These include enhancements in security and compliance, architecture and administration, and user experiences. These key enhancements are introduced below.

Note: Some of the documentation referenced may not be fully available at the time of publishing of this post.

Security and Compliance

SP1 provides enhancements improving security and compliance capabilities in Exchange Server 2013. This includes improvements in the Data Loss Prevention (DLP) feature and the return of S/MIME encryption for Outlook Web App users.

  • DLP Policy Tips in Outlook Web App – DLP Policy Tips are now enabled for Outlook Web App (OWA) and OWA for Devices. These are the same Policy Tips available in Outlook 2013. DLP Policy Tips appear when a user attempts to send a message containing sensitive data that matches a DLP policy. Learn more about DLP Policy Tips.
  • DLP Document Fingerprinting – DLP policies already allow you to detect sensitive information such as financial or personal data. DLP Document Fingerprinting expands this capability to detect forms used in your organization. For example, you can create a document fingerprint based on your organization’s patent request form to identify when users are sending that form, and then use DLP actions to properly control dissemination of the content. Learn more about DLP Document Fingerprinting.
  • DLP sensitive information types for new regions – SP1 provides an expanded set of standard DLP sensitive information types covering an increased set of regions. SP1 adds region support for Poland, Finland and Taiwan. Learn more about the DLP sensitive information types available.
  • S/MIME support for OWA – SP1 also reintroduces the S/MIME feature in OWA, enabling OWA users to send and receive signed and encrypted email. Signed messages allow the recipient to verify that the message came from the specified sender and contains the only the content from the sender. This capability is supported when using OWA with Internet Explorer 9 or later. Learn more about S/MIME in Exchange 2013.

Architecture & Administration

These improvements help Exchange meet our customer requirements and stay in step with the latest platforms.

  • Windows Server 2012 R2 support – Exchange 2013 SP1 adds Windows Server 2012 R2 as a supported operating system and Active Directory environment for both domain and forest functional levels. For the complete configuration support information refer to the Exchange Server Supportability Matrix. This matrix includes details regarding Windows Server 2012 R2 support information about earlier versions of Exchange.
  • Exchange Admin Center Cmdlet Logging – The Exchange 2010 Management Console includes PowerShell cmdlet logging functionality. Listening to your feedback, we’re happy to announce that this functionality is now included in the Exchange Admin Center (EAC). The logging feature enables you to capture and review the recent (up to 500) commands executed in the EAC user interface while the logging window is open. Logging is invoked from the EAC help menu and continues logging while the logging window remains open.

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  • ADFS for OWA – Also new for Outlook Web App in SP1 is claims-based authentication for organizations using Active Directory Federation Services. Learn more about the scenario.
  • Edge Transport server role – SP1 also reintroduces the Edge Transport server role. If you have deployed Exchange 2013 with a supported legacy Exchange Edge Transport role, you don’t need to upgrade. That configuration is still supported. But we do recommend that future deployments use the Exchange 2013 Edge Transport role. Learn more about Edge Transport in Exchange 2013.
  • New communication method for Exchange and Outlook – SP1 introduces a new communication method for Exchange Server and Microsoft Outlook called MAPI over HTTP(MAPI/HTTP). This communication method simplifies connectivity troubleshooting and improves the user connection experience with resuming from hibernate or switching networks. MAPI/HTTP is disabled by default, allowing you to decide when to enable it for your organization. MAPI/HTTP can be used in place of RPC/HTTP (Outlook Anywhere) for your Outlook 2013 SP1 clients while Outlook 2013 RTM and older clients continue to use RPC/HTTP. Learn more about deploying MAPI/HTTP.
  • DAGs without Cluster Administrative Access PointsWindows Server 2012 R2 introduces failover clusters that can operate without an administrative access point: no IP addresses or IP address resource, no network name resource, and no cluster name object. SP1 enables you to create a DAG without an administrative access point on Windows Server 2012 R2 from EAC or PowerShell. This is an optional DAG configuration for SP1 and requires Windows Server 2012 R2. DAGs with administrative access points continue to be supported. Learn more about creating a DAG without an administrative access point here and here.
  • SSL offloading – SP1 now supports SSL offloading, allowing you to terminate incoming SSL connections in front of your CAS servers and move the SSL workload (encryption & decryption tasks) to a load balancer device. Learn how to configure SSL offloading in Exchange 2013.

User Experience

We know the user experience is crucial to running a great messaging platform. SP1 provides continued enhancements to help your users work smarter.

  • Enhanced text editor for OWA – OWA now uses the same rich text editor as SharePoint, thereby improving the user experience, and enabling several new formatting and composition capabilities that you expect from modern Web application – more pasting options, rich previews to linked content, and the ability to create and modify tables.

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  • Apps for Office in Compose – Mail apps are now available for use during the creation of new mail messages. This allows developers to build and users to leverage apps that can help them while they are composing mails. The compose apps leverage the Apps for Office platform and can be added via the existing Office store or corporate catalogs. Learn more about Apps for Office.

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Upgrading to SP1/Deploying SP1

As with all cumulative updates (CUs), SP1 is a full build of Exchange, and the deployment of SP1 is just like the deployment of a cumulative update.

Active Directory Preparation

Prior to or concurrent with upgrading or deploying SP1 onto a server, you must update Active Directory. These are the required actions to perform prior to installing SP1 on a server.

1. Exchange 2013 SP1 includes schema changes. Therefore, you will need to execute the following command to apply the schema changes.

setup.exe /PrepareSchema /IAcceptExchangeServerLicenseTerms

2. Exchange 2013 SP1 includes enterprise Active Directory changes (e.g., RBAC roles have been updated to support new cmdlets and/or properties). Therefore, you will need to execute the following command.

setup.exe /PrepareAD /IAcceptExchangeServerLicenseTerms

Server Deployment

Once the above preparatory steps are completed, you can install SP1 on your servers. Of course, as always, if you don’t separately perform the above steps, they will be performed by Setup when you install your first Exchange 2013 SP1 server. If this is your first Exchange 2013 server deployment, you will need to deploy both Client Access Server and Mailbox Server roles in your organization.

If you already deployed Exchange 2013 RTM code and want to upgrade to SP1, you will run the following command from a command line.

setup.exe /m:upgrade /IAcceptExchangeServerLicenseTerms

Alternatively you can start the installation through the GUI installer.

Hybrid deployments and EOA

Customers in hybrid deployments where Exchange is deployed on-premises and in the cloud, or who are using Exchange Online Archiving (EOA) with their on-premises Exchange deployment are required to maintain currency on Cumulative Update/Service Pack releases.

Looking Ahead

Our next update for Exchange 2013 will be released as Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 5. This CU release will continue the Exchange Server 2013 release process.

If you want to learn more about Exchange Server 2013 SP1 and have the opportunity to ask questions to the Exchange team in person, come join us at the Microsoft Exchange Conference.

(Source: http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2014/02/25/exchange-server-2013-service-pack-1-available.aspx )

Cheers,

Chris

Hi,

Exchange 2013 CU2  was released yesterday. Until now, no further release notes are available.

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=39609

I’ll Keep you up to date.

UPDATE:

Changes in Exchange 2013 RTM CU2

In addition to bug fixes, Exchange 2013 RTM CU2 introduces enhancements in the following areas.

  • Per-server database support
  • OWA Redirection
  • High Availability
  • Managed Availability
  • Cmdlet Help
  • OWA Search Improvements
  • Malware Filter Rules

Per-Server Database Support

As mentioned previously, Exchange 2013 RTM CU2 increases the per-server database support from 50 databases to 100 databases in the Enterprise Edition of the product. Please note that this architectural change may not provide any additional scalability as CPU may be a bottleneck, thereby limiting the number of mailboxes you can deploy per-server.

As promised, the Exchange 2013 Server Role Requirements Calculator has been updated for this architectural change.

OWA Redirection

Depending on your deployment model, Exchange 2013 RTM CU1 supported the following redirection or proxy scenarios:

  1. In environments where Exchange 2013 and Exchange 2010 coexist, Exchange 2013 CAS proxies OWA requests to Exchange 2010 CAS for Exchange 2010 mailboxes.
  2. In environments where Exchange 2013 and Exchange 2007 coexist, Exchange 2013 CAS redirects the request to the Exchange 2007 CAS infrastructure’s ExternalURL. While this redirection is silent, it is not a single sign-on event.
  3. In native Exchange 2013 environments:
    1. Exchange 2013 CAS proxies the OWA request directly to the Exchange 2013 Mailbox server when in a single site.
    2. Exchange 2013 CAS proxies the OWA request directly to the Exchange 2013 Mailbox server when the Mailbox server exists in a different site and the CAS infrastructure in the target site has no ExternalURL defined.
    3. Exchange 2013 CAS proxies the OWA request directly to the Exchange 2013 Mailbox server when the Mailbox server exists in a different site and the CAS infrastructure in the target site has an ExternalURL that matches the source site’s ExternalURL.
    4. Exchange 2013 CAS redirects the OWA request to the CAS infrastructure in the target site when the target site’s ExternalURL does not match the source site’s ExternalURL. While this redirection is silent, it is not a single sign-on event.

Exchange 2013 RTM CU2 changes this behavior by providing a single sign-on experience when Forms-Based Authentication (FBA) is used on the source and destination OWA virtual directories by issuing back to the web browser a hidden FBA form with the fields populated. This hidden form contains the same information as what the user had originally submitted to the source CAS FBA page (username, password, public/private selector) as well as, a redirect to the target Exchange specific path and query string. As soon as this form is loaded it is immediately submitted to the target URL. The result is the user is automatically authenticated and can access the mailbox data.

Many of you may be familiar with this functionality in Exchange 2010 SP2. However, there are differences in the Exchange 2013 RTM CU2 implementation:

  1. Silent redirection is the default behavior in Exchange 2013, meaning that if FBA is enabled on source and target OWA virtual directories, the redirection will also be a single sign-on event.
  2. You can disable silent redirection on the source CAS via the web.config file located at <ExchangeSetupDir>\FrontEnd\HttpProxy\owa by adding the following line in the <appSettings>section:<add key=”DisableSSORedirects” value=”true” />

High Availability

Exchange 2013 RTM CU2 introduces a new service, the DAG Management Service. The DAG Management service contains non-critical code that used to reside in the Replication service. This change does not introduce any additional complexities in event reporting, either – events are written into the Application event log with the source of MSExchangeRepl and crimson channel.

Managed Availability

In addition to improvements in various probes and monitors, there have been changes to the responder throttling framework. Prior to Exchange 2013 RTM CU2, many responders were only throttled per-server (e.g., RestartService). Now, these responders are throttled per group. For example, originally RestartService was throttled based on the number of occurrences that occurred on a server; in Exchange 2013 RTM CU2, RestartService can execute every 60 minutes DAG-wide, with a maximum of 4 restarts per day DAG-wide.

RecoveryAction Enabled Per Server Per Group
Minutes Between Actions Max Allowed Per Hour Max Allowed Per Day Minutes Between Actions Max Allowed Per Day
ForceReboot True 720 N/A 1 600 4
SystemFailover True 60 N/A 1 60 4
RestartService True 60   N/A 1 60 4
ResetIISPool True 60 N/A 1 60 4
DatabaseFailover True 120 N/A 1 120 4
ComponentOffline True 60 N/A 1 60 4
ComponentOnline True 5 12 288 5 Large
MoveClusterGroup True 240 N/A 1 480 3
ResumeCatalog True 5 4 8 5 12
WatsonDump True 480 N/A 1 720 4

Cmdlet Help

Exchange 2013 RTM CU2 introduces the capability for administrators to get updates to Exchange Management Shell cmdlets without needing to deploy a new service pack or cumulative update. Administrators can launch the Exchange Management Shell and run the Update-ExchangeHelp cmdlet to update their local Shell help.

OWA Search Improvements

Previously searching for keywords within OWA did not give indications of the location of the keyword in the search result set. Exchange 2013 RTM CU2 improves OWA’s search results highlighting in three ways:

  1. Conversation items are auto-expanded that have hits in them.
  2. Whenever you search for a term and select a conversation from the result list, OWA will move the scroll position of the reading pane so that the first item part with that search term is in view.
  3. Hit navigation within a conversation – you can jump between search hits quickly using a control built into the reading pane.

Malware Filter Rules

Exchange 2013 RTM CU2 introduces the –MalwareFilterRule cmdlets. You can use the –MalwareFilterRule cmdlets to apply custom malware filter policies to specific users, groups, or domains in your organization. Custom policies always take precedence over the default company-wide policy, but you can change the priority (that is, the running order) of your custom policies.

(Source: http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2013/07/09/released-exchange-server-2013-rtm-cumulative-update-2.aspx )

Cheers,

Chris

We know a lot of you have been waiting for this, and so it is with great excitement that we announce that Exchange Server 2013 RTM Cumulative Update 1 (CU1) has been released to the web and is available for immediate download! This is the first release using the new servicing model for Exchange Server 2013. In addition to this article, the Exchange 2013 RTM CU1 release notes are also available.

Note: Article links may not be immediately available at the time of this post’s publishing. Exchange 2013 documentation update for CU1, including Release Notes, is scheduled for tomorrow (4/3/2013) .

CU1 is the minimum version of Exchange 2013 required for on-premises coexistence with supported legacy Exchange Server versions. The final build number for CU1 is 15.0.620.29. For more information on coexistence, check out the Planning and Deployment documentation, and this Ignite webcast covering deployment of and coexistence with Exchange Server 2013.

Upgrading/Deploying Cumulative Update 1

Unlike previous versions, cumulative updates do not use the rollup infrastructure; cumulative updates are actually full builds of the product, meaning that when you want to deploy a new server, you simply use the latest cumulative update build available and do not necessarily need to apply additional Exchange Server updates.

Active Directory Preparation

Prior to upgrading or deploying the new build onto a server, you will need to update Active Directory. For those of you with a diverse Active Directory permissions model you will want to perform the following steps:

  1. Exchange 2013 RTM CU1 includes schema changes. Therefore, you will need to execute setup.exe /PrepareSchema.
  2. Exchange 2013 RTM CU1 includes enterprise Active Directory changes (e.g., RBAC roles have been updated to support new cmdlets and/or properties). Therefore, you will need to execute setup.exe /PrepareAD.
  3. Exchange 2013 RTM CU1 includes changes to the permissions within the domain partition (e.g., Exchange Servers have been granted the ability to modify msExchActiveSyncDevices class on inetOrgPerson objects). Therefore, you will need to execute setup.exe /PrepareDomain in each domain containing Exchange servers or mailboxes.
Note: If your environment contains only Exchange 2007, and you upgrade to Exchange 2013, keep in mind you cannot deploy Exchange 2010 in that environment at a later time. If you foresee a need to deploy Exchange 2010 servers into your environment, deploy an Exchange 2010 multi-role server (with all four servers roles) prior to executing Exchange 2013 setup.exe /PrepareAD. As long as you retain at least one role of each legacy server, you will continue to be able to install additional servers of that version into your coexistence environment. Once you remove the last server role of a legacy version, you will no longer be able to reintroduce that version into the environment.

Coexistence Pre-Deployment Step: OAB Verification

As mentioned in the Exchange Server 2013 CU1 release notes, when you deploy the first Exchange 2013 Mailbox server in an existing Exchange organization, a new default Offline Address Book is created.

CU1-1
Figure 1: The new OAB as shown in an Exchange Server 2010 SP3 & 2013 CU1 environment

All existing clients that rely on an OAB will see this new default OAB the next time they look for an OAB update. This will cause these clients to perform a full OAB download. To prevent this from happening, you can configure your existing mailbox databases to explicitly point to the current default OAB prior to introducing the first Exchange 2013 server. You can do this one of two ways:

  1. Within the Exchange Management Console (EMC), navigate to Organization Configuration –> Mailbox –> Database Management –> Mailbox Database Properties –> Client Settings.CU1-2
    Figure 2: Modifying the default Offline Address Book at the database level in the EMC
  2. Alternatively, if you have many mailbox databases to update, the following Exchange Management Shell command can be used to view all mailbox databases without a default OAB explicitly set on them. If you have both Exchange 2007 and Exchange 2010 deployed on-premises then you will have to run the following commands using the respective Exchange Management Shell version as the Get/Set-MailboxDatabase commands are version specific.Get-MailboxDatabase | Where {$_.OfflineAddressBook -eq $Null} | FT Name,OfflineAddressBook -AutoSizeIf no values are returned then you are already prepared. However, if you need to configure some databases, then this next command will find all mailbox databases in an Exchange 2007 or Exchange 2010 environment with no default OAB defined at the database level, and it will set it to the current default OAB in the org.

    Get-MailboxDatabase | Where {$_.OfflineAddressBook -eq $Null} | Set-MailboxDatabase -OfflineAddressBook (Get-OfflineAddressBook | Where {$_.IsDefault -eq $True})

    To confirm all Exchange 2007/2010 mailbox databases now have a defined default OAB, re-run the first command. This time it should return no entries.

Server Deployment

Once the preparatory steps are completed, you can then deploy CU1 and start your coexistence journey. If this is your first Exchange 2013 server deployment, you will need to deploy both an Exchange 2013 Client Access Server and an Exchange 2013 Mailbox Server into the organization. As explained in Exchange 2013 Client Access Server Role, CAS 2013 is simply an authentication and proxy/redirection server; all data processing (including the execution of remote PowerShell cmdlets) occurs on the Mailbox server. You can either deploy a multi-role server or each role separately (just remember if you deploy them separately, you cannot manage the Exchange 2013 environment until you install both roles).

If you already deployed Exchange 2013 RTM code and want to upgrade to CU1, you will run setup.exe /m:upgrade from a command line after completing the Active Directory preparatory steps or run through the GUI installer. Deploying future cumulative updates will operate in the same manner.

Note: Unlike previous versions, in Exchange 2013, you cannot uninstall a single role from a multi-role server. For example, if you deploy the CAS and MBX roles on a single machine, you cannot later execute setup to remove the CAS role; you can only uninstall all server roles.

Mailbox Sizes in Exchange Server 2013

As you start migrating your mailboxes to Exchange 2013, one thing you may notice is that your mailboxes appear to be larger post move.

As you can imagine, with hosting millions of mailboxes in Office 365, accurate storage reporting is essential, just like in your on-premises deployments. One of the learnings that we accrued into the on-premises product is ensuring that the mailbox usage statistics are more closely aligned with the capacity usage within the Mailbox database. The impact of reporting space more accurately means that mailbox quota limits may need to be adjusted prior to the mailbox move so that users are not locked out of their mailbox during the migration process.

Our improved space calculations may result in a mailbox’s reported size increasing on average of 30% when the mailbox is moved from a legacy version of Exchange to Exchange 2013. For example, if a mailbox is reported as 10GB in size on Exchange Server 2010, then when the mailbox is moved to Exchange 2013, it may be reported as 13GB. This does not mean that migrating to Exchange 2013 will increase your capacity footprint by 30% per mailbox; it only means that the statistics are including more data about the space the mailbox consumes. 30% is an average value, based on what we have experienced in Exchange Online. Customers with pilot mailboxes should determine what their own average increase value may be as some environments may see higher or lower values depending on the most prevalent type of email within their mailboxes. Again, this does not mean there will be an increase in the size of the database file on disk; only the attribution of space to each mailbox will increase.

New Functionality Included in Cumulative Update 1

Exchange 2013 RTM CU1 includes a number of bug fixes and enhancements over the RTM release of Exchange 2013. Some of the more notable enhancements are identified below.

Address Book Policies

As discussed recently, an Address Book Policy Routing Agent has been included in Exchange 2013 RTM CU1. For all the juicy details, see Address Book Policies, Jamba Jokes and Secret Agents.

Groups can once again manage groups!

In Exchange 2010 you could not use a group as an owner for another group for membership management. Instead you had to deploy explicit permissions on groups or use a script as a workaround.

Since Exchange 2010’s release both Microsoft Support and the Exchange Product Group received resounding feedback on the need for this capability. The good news is that with Exchange 2013 RTM CU1 groups can once again be owners of groups for membership management.

Public Folder Favorites Access through Outlook Web App

In Exchange Server 2013 RTM there was no way to access Public Folder content through Outlook Web App. In CU1 you will now have access to Public Folders you have added as favorites via your favorites menu either in Outlook or Outlook Web App. However, this access is limited to Public Folders stored on Exchange Server 2013.

OWA_PFs
Figure 3: Adding a Public Folder as a favorite in Outlook Web App in Exchange Server 2013 RTM CU1

Remember, you cannot start creating Public Folders on Exchange Server 2013 until all users have been migrated to Exchange Server 2013. For how to migrate from legacy Public Folders to Exchange Server 2013 Public Folders, see Migrate Public Folders to Exchange 2013 From Previous Versions.

Exchange Admin Center Enhancements

The Exchange Admin Center (EAC) has been enhanced and now includes Unified Messaging management, improvements in the migration UI allowing more migration options reducing the gap between PowerShell and the UI, and general overall improvements in the user experience for consistency and simplification based on customer feedback.

High Availability and Monitoring Enhancements

There are have been several enhancements in the high availability and Managed Availability space. In particular:

  • The Best Copy Selection algorithm now honors MaximumActiveDatabases.
  • Auto-reseed now supports disks that have Bitlocker encryption.
  • Many probes, monitors, and responders have been updated and improved over the RTM release.
  • Get-HealthReport cmdlet has been streamlined and its performance has been optimized.
  • Exchange 2013 RTM CU1 will support the Exchange Server 2013 Management Pack for System Center Operations Manager (SCOM); this management pack will be available at a later date. This management pack is supported on SCOM 2007 R2 and SCOM 2012.

On behalf of the Exchange Product Group, thanks again for your continued support and patience, and please keep the feedback coming.

(Source: EHLO Team Blog)

Originally, we stated we would deliver Exchange 2013 RTM Cumulative Update 1 (CU1) by the end of this quarter.  Unfortunately, we are not going to meet that goal. We know that many of you will be disappointed as a result of this statement. We understand your pain, however, the decision to delay is due to an issue we found in our final test pass coupled with feedback from members within our Technology Adoption Program community.

Specifically, we found an issue with Exchange 2010 coexistence. The issue actually had an easy workaround, but we made a decision; instead of burdening you with a configuration change on all of your Exchange 2010 Client Access servers, we decided to take a code change in Exchange 2013 and solve the problem so that you will not have to make any additional configuration changes. Given that the goal of CU1 is to enable coexistence with legacy versions of Exchange, we felt this was the right decision; after all, we want to ensure that your upgrade to Exchange 2013 and your coexistence period goes as smooth as possible.

As previously mentioned, Exchange 2013’s update strategy is different from previous releases; we are uncoupling security updates and reducing the number of updates we release. In addition to those changes, we will continue to evaluate issues as they are identified during development (even during the final test pass) and if we determine that the vast majority of on-premises customers are affected, we will do everything we can to mitigate the issue prior to release, even if that means delaying the release.

We regret the impact that this delay has on our customers, and as always, we continue to identify ways to better serve your needs through our regular servicing releases. The release date for Exchange 2013 RTM CU1 is currently planned for April 2nd. We will let you know if that date changes, as well as, post an announcement when the download is live.
 

Hello folks,

today the Exchange CXP team released the following update rollups to the Download Center. All three releases cover Security Bulletin MS12-080. Because this is a security release, the updates will also be available on Microsoft Update.

Read more on Tony Redmonds Blog.

Cheers,

Chris

(Source: EHLO Blog )

The New Exchange Reaches RTM!

Posted: October 17, 2012 in Exchange 2013, Info
Tags: , , ,

Today we reached an important milestone in the development of the new Exchange.

Moments ago, the Exchange engineering team signed off on the Release to Manufacturing (RTM) build. This milestone means the coding and testing phase of the project is complete and we are now focused on releasing the new Exchange via multiple distribution channels to our business customers. General availability is planned for the first quarter of 2013.

We have a number of programs that provide business customers with early access so they can begin testing, piloting and adopting Exchange within their organizations:

  • We will begin rolling out new capabilities to Office 365 Enterprise customers in our next service updates, starting in November through general availability.
  • Volume Licensing customers with Software Assurance will be able to download Exchange Server 2013 through the Volume Licensing Service Center by mid-November. These products will be available on the Volume Licensing price list on December 1.

Since announcing the Preview of the new Exchange back in July, the EHLO team has been actively blogging about the features and capabilities of the new Exchange.  We’re excited to start getting the finished product into the hands of our customers!

For those who are interested in learning more about the new Exchange, check out the series of posts that have been published over the past couple months:

In addition to Exchange, the new Office, SharePoint, and Lync have also reached RTM.  For more information on the announcement, go to Office News.  Thanks again for your continued support, and please do keep the feedback coming!

Source: EHLO Blog

Cheers, Chris